midbad

Cite this: eDIL s.v. midbad or dil.ie/32169
Last Revised: 2013

Forms: mi[d]bhaid

n a legal term occurring in the term fer m.¤ given to a member of a low class of freeman, appar. a young man not yet possessed of hereditary land , his father being alive (Thurneysen, ZCP xiv 343 , 361 , cf. MacNeill, MacNeill, Law of status 277 n. 1 ; MacNeill, ib. 283 n. 1 , explains as fer midboth `a between-house man', `a man of mid-cottages', from 2 both `booth, cabin'), a youth living on his father's land. is e bēs foloing fer midbad, Laws ii 258.18 . saeiri fir m.¤ , v 106.18 . cadeat grad tuaithi? Fer midba, bo-aire, etc., iv 298.12 (Crith Gabl.) = fer midbotha, ib. 17 . fer midhbadh (grade of the Féne corresponding to fochlach in grades of poets), 354.21 . ōtā fer miudbu co righ, ii 146.10 Comm. (extremes of rank). cema he righ Ereann ┐ in fear mbidhbaid, H 3.18 p. 218ab ( O'Curry 388 ), cf. Laws v 42.23 . ōna teora fearuibh midbuidh `the three lowest grades', Laws ii 152.12 Comm. na tri fir midba, a tri n-eineclann, H 3.18 p. 177b ( O'Curry 322 ); the three classes of fer m.¤ , acc. to this passage, were aged respectively 14, 20, and 30, cf. Laws iv 300.

Cf. further: immat buar. terc ass. midhbuidh tromm in gach tír (signs of degenerate times) `dependants burdensome', SG 80.9 = mi[d]bhaid, Lism. L. p. xxvi (= BLism. 29a2 ), where Stokes quotes P. O'C. : miodhbhaidh .i. eineachlann `a mulct or fine'; cf. miodbhaidh .i. eineaclann honour-price , O'Cl. , a gloss perh. due to misunderstanding of a passage like that from H 3.18, 177b quoted above. The meaning above may be men of low standing or juniors .